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Les Titans 1962 Dvdrip 1


The first flight of the Titan II was in March 1962 and the missile, now designated LGM-25C, reached initial operating capability in October 1963. The Titan II contained one W-53 nuclear warhead in a Mark 6 re-entry vehicle with a range of 8,700 nautical miles (10,000 mi; 16,100 km). The W-53 had a yield of 9 megatons. This warhead was guided to its target using an inertial guidance unit. The 54 deployed Titan IIs formed the backbone of America's strategic deterrent force until the LGM-30 Minuteman ICBM was deployed en masse during the early to mid-1960s. Twelve Titan IIs were flown in NASA's Gemini crewed space program in the mid-1960s.[6]




les titans 1962 dvdrip 1



The first Titan II launch, Missile N-2, was carried out on 16 March 1962 from LC-16 at Cape Canaveral and performed extremely well, flying 5,000 miles (8,000 km) downrange and depositing its reentry vehicle in the Ascension splash net. There was only one problem: a high rate of longitudinal vibrations during first stage burn. While this did not affect missile launches for the Air Force, NASA officials were concerned that this phenomenon would be harmful to astronauts on a crewed Gemini flight. The second launch, Missile N-1, lifted from LC-15 on 7 June. First stage performance was near-nominal, but the second stage developed low thrust due to a restriction in the gas generator feed. The Range Safety officer sent a manual shutdown command to the second stage, causing premature RV separation and impact well short of the intended target point. The third launch, Missile N-6 on 11 July, was completely successful. Aside from pogo oscillation (the nickname NASA engineers invented for the Titan's vibration problem since it was thought to resemble the action of a pogo stick),[8] the Titan II was experiencing other teething problems that were expected of a new launch vehicle. The 25 July test (Vehicle N-4) had been scheduled for 27 June, but was delayed by a month when the Titan's right engine experienced severe combustion instability at ignition that caused the entire thrust chamber to break off of the booster and fall down the flame deflector pit, landing about 20 feet from the pad (the Titan's onboard computer shut the engines down the moment loss of thrust occurred). The problem was traced to a bit of cleaning alcohol carelessly left in the engine. A new set of engines had to be ordered from Aerojet, and the missile lifted off from LC-16 on the morning of 25 July. The flight went entirely according to plan up to first stage burn, but the second stage malfunctioned again when the hydraulic pump failed and thrust dropped nearly 50%. The computer system compensated by running the engine for an additional 111 seconds, when propellant depletion occurred. Because the computer had not sent a manual cutoff command, reentry vehicle separation and vernier solo phase did not occur. Impact occurred 1,500 miles (2,400 km) downrange, half the planned distance.[9]


By the mid-1980s, with the stock of refurbished Atlas E/F missiles finally starting to run out, the Air Force decided to reuse decommissioned Titan IIs for space launches. The Martin Marietta Astronautics Group was awarded a contract in January 1986 to refurbish, integrate, and launch fourteen Titan II ICBMs for government space launch requirements. These were designated Titan 23G. The Air Force successfully launched the first Titan 23G space launch vehicle from Vandenberg Air Force Base 5 September 1988. NASA's Clementine spacecraft was launched aboard a Titan 23G in January 1994. All Titan 23G missions were launched from Space Launch Complex 4 West (SLC-4W) on Vandenberg Air Force Base, under the operational command of the 6595th Aerospace Test Group and its follow-on organizations of the 4th Space Launch Squadron and 2nd Space Launch Squadron. The Titan 23G ended up being less of a cost-saving measure than anticipated as the expense of refurbishing the missiles for space launches turned out to be more than the cost of flying a brand-new Delta booster. Unlike refurbished Atlas missiles, which were completely torn down and rebuilt from the ground up, the Titan 23G had relatively few changes aside from replacing the warhead interface and adding range safety and telemetry packages. The engines were merely given a brief static firing to verify their functionality. Of the 13 launches, there was one failure, when a launch of a Landsat satellite in 1993 ended in a useless orbit due to a malfunction of the satellite kick motor. The last Titan II launch was on 18 October 2003 when a DMSP weather satellite was successfully launched. This flight had been scheduled for launch in early 2001, but persistent problems with the booster and satellite delayed it over two years. A total of 282 Titan IIs were launched between 1962 and 2003, of which 25 were space launches.


Over the next six years the upgraded Atlas E and F were also deployed across the United States. At their peak, 132 Atlas sites were operational from December 1962 through May 1964. After that time, the Atlas was phased out in favor of Minuteman and Titan ICBM's.


Col. Barry Little, 341st Missile Wing commander, left, Lt. Col. Joseph Shannon III, 10th Missile Squadron commander, middle, and Tom Crowley, former Boeing electromagnetic engineer, prepare to give remarks at a ceremony of the 60th anniversary of the First Ace in the Hole, Oct. 27, 2022, at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Mont. Crowley and his team handed over the A-06 launch facility to the 10th MS on Oct. 24, 1962. Three days later, the A-01 Minuteman came on alert and the Soviet Union pulled their missiles out of Cuba. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Elijah Van Zandt) (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Elijah Van Zandt)


Tom Crowley, former Boeing electromagnetic engineer, shakes the hand of Lt. Col. Joseph Shannon III, 10th MIssile Squadron commander, while joined on stage by Col. Barry Little, 341st Missile Wing commander, before the start of a ceremony on the 60th anniversary of the First Ace in the Hole, Oct. 27, 2022, at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Mont. Crowley and his team handed over the A-06 launch facility to the 10th MS on Oct. 24, 1962. Three days later, the A-01 Minuteman came on alert and the Soviet Union pulled their missiles out of Cuba. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Elijah Van Zandt)


On Oct. 27, 1962, the world stood by with bated breath watching and waiting to see how the events of the Cuban Missile Crisis would unfold. Now, 60 years later, a legacy of peace has persisted, ensured by Airmen and Guardians perpetually on alert since that day. 350c69d7ab


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